Pelvic Pain

Pelvic Pain Specialist
Pelvic pain stems from any number of conditions, including problems with reproductive, urinary, or digestive issues. Though often not due to a single cause, the medical professionals at Gemini OBGYN in Pembroke Pines and Weston, Florida, are experts in diagnosis. If you’re having problems with pelvic pain, call for an appointment today.

Pelvic Pain Q & A

What is pelvic pain and what other symptoms does it present?

Pelvic pain occurs anywhere between the hips and below the bellybutton. When it lasts longer than 6 months, whether continuously or intermittently, it’s referred to as chronic pelvic pain. It may be a condition on its own, a symptom of another disease, or it may occur as a cumulation of several conditions. Sometimes it’s difficult to identify a single cause for the pain.

The location of pain may not be focused, and may be felt through the pelvic region. Symptoms may be described as:

  •         Dull and aching or sharp and cramp-like pain
  •         Pain that’s steady and constant
  •         Pain that’s intermittent or varying
  •         Pressure deep within the pelvis area
  •         Pain occurring during intercourse, bowel movements, or urination
  •         Pain that’s aggravated by either sitting or standing for long periods, but usually relieved when lying down

What causes pelvic pain?

Usually, chronic pelvic pain is complex and it can have multiple causes. Other times it may be related to a single cause. Depression, emotional distress, and chronic stress are a few psychological factors that may contribute to pelvic pain. Physical causes may include:

  •         Endometriosis
  •         Tension in pelvic muscles
  •         Breakdown or straining of pelvic connective tissue
  •         Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease
  •         Ovarian cysts
  •         Fibroids
  •         Irritable bowel syndrome
  •         Interstitial cystitis

How is pelvic pain treated?

Doctors may prescribe medications to help ease pelvic pain. Over-the-counter or prescription pain relief may manage pain, but will provide little in the way of solving the problem. When pelvic pain seems tied to a woman’s menstrual cycle, hormone treatments may be effective. If infection is the source, antibiotics may clear up pelvic pain. Certain antidepressants have pain-relieving effects as well as mood-altering abilities, and these can sometimes reduce pelvic pain even in women without depression issues.

When specific points of origin for pelvic pain are identified, the doctor may inject long-acting, local anesthetics into those spots. Seeing a physical therapist for exercises and treatments may be effective in helping chronic pain stemming from soft tissue performance. If the doctor finds a problem that requires surgery, that may remove the source of the pain.

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