UTI

UTI Specialist
Since women are at greater risk of contracting urinary tract infections (UTIs) than men, the health care professionals at Gemini OBGYN in Pembroke Pines and Weston, Florida, are no strangers to UTI treatment. With prompt attention, UTIs are typically easy to treat with few complications. Call today for an appointment so you can recover as quickly as possible.

UTI Q & A

What is a UTI?

Any infection occurring in the urinary system — the kidneys through the ureters, to the bladder and urethra — comes under the UTI name. Most infections affect the lower tract, the bladder and urethra. While most lower UTIs are more annoying than dangerous, they can be quite painful. Should the UTI spread to the kidneys, however, the infection becomes much more serious. UTIs are treated easily in the early stages, and there are things a woman can do to reduce the chances of infection in the first place.

What are the symptoms of UTIs?

Not all UTIs display symptoms. When they do, these most commonly include:

  •         A persistent urge to urinate, while only producing a small amount
  •         Burning sensation when urinating
  •         Cloudy urine, or indications of blood, such as pink, red, or cola-colored urine
  •         Strong odors to the urine
  •         Pain, usually in the center of the pelvis

Each symptom may be a clue as to the type of UTI and the part of the urinary system that’s affected.

What causes UTIs?

UTIs usually occur when bacteria enter the urinary tract. The urinary system usually keeps these bacteria in check, but the system is occasionally overwhelmed and bacteria multiply to a level sufficient to cause infection. Bacteria may arrive via the digestive system, given the proximity between urethra and anus, but other bacteria may be introduced during sexual intercourse. Some UTIs stem from complications of sexually-transmitted infections as well.

How can I avoid UTIs in the first place?

There are things you can do to ease symptoms as well as avoid being infected in the first place. Drinking lots of water dilutes your urine and keeps the urinary system flushed out and functioning.

When you do have a UTI, lots of water remains a good idea. As well, avoid alcohol, caffeine and citrus, which can irritate the bladder and increase burning sensations when you urinate. While the evidence is mixed, some studies indicate that cranberry juice may help prevent UTIs, especially in women who suffer recurrent infections. It does have some drug interactions, so check with the doctor before drinking cranberry juice, especially if you’re using blood thinners or other prescription medications.

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